Quick Guide: Calling into Talk Show Radio Programs

 

QUICK GUIDE: CALLING INTO TALK SHOW RADIO PROGRAMS

 

STEP ONE: BEFORE YOU CALL

 

*     If you have Call Waiting, then cancel that function.

 

*     If possible, do not use a cordless or cellular phone as you might experience disruption of service or interference.

 

*     Turn off all noisy appliances, including your air conditioner, computer, TV and radio receiver, fan, etc. You way want to go into a room where there are no other people and no pets. Shut the door.

 

STEP TWO: GETTING YOUR MESSAGE ACROSS ON THE AIR:

 

*     The broadcast audience is constantly tuning in and out. Therefore, you should make your presentation free-standing, insofar as the listener's ability to understand it. For example, you should not begin your call with anything that sounds like this: "I just want to say that I disagree with the previous caller. S/He is entirely wrong."

 

*     Don't throw away your time reiterating what the other caller just said. Use the time to make YOUR statement of the facts.

 

*     Refrain from using these non words: "uh, ah, er"

 

*     Do not interrupt the host or the guest.

 

*     Do not try to introduce too many topics. Just one is fine. You don't want to sound pushy or over zealous. Making ONE good point is excellent!

 

*     Don't waste time "beating around the bush” (pun intended). People who are not professional communicators might say "Am I on the air? Oh." Also, do not throw away precious seconds thanking everyone at the station for the opportunity to speak. Instead, get to the substance.

 

*     At the same time, you should know that TV viewers and radio listeners need a few seconds to get used to your voice. In the opening seconds of your speech, listeners will be thinking about your voice, not the substance of what you're saying. The bottom line is simple: Don't present the most vital information during the opening seconds. Nobody will be able to comprehend it. (This phenomenon is true for radio and TV. It is not valid for print media nor Internet content.)

 

*     State facts and figures firmly and stick to what you know to be true. Sometimes a radio host will try to frame your contribution as if it's your personal opinion. Don’t fall into that trap! Remain confident and be strong & your participation will make a difference!